Fishing lets troubles fly away

Learning skills opens door to magic of moving water

Posted 7/30/18

Fly fishing is different. Most of the time it requires using a fly rod and an artificial fly on typically moving water. Casting the weightless fly using a specialized line is different and entails …

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Fishing lets troubles fly away

Learning skills opens door to magic of moving water

Posted

Fly fishing is different.

Most of the time it requires using a fly rod and an artificial fly on typically moving water. Casting the weightless fly using a specialized line is different and entails different techniques and skills from spin casting.

Spin fishing is simpler, while fly fishing takes more learning and practice. Spin fishing is more prevalent in lakes and ponds while fly fishing is more widespread on rivers and streams. And then it is vital to know how to tie knots and choose the correct flies to use for certain locations and conditions.

Fly fishing can be intimidating for beginners.

“It’s a specialty sport but anybody can do it,” said Rick Typher, who owns Denver Angler in Centennial. “The best way to start is to take classes. You can have friends try and teach you but they are there to fish. The best way is to take a class, and we do everything from casting, knots, what flies and reading rivers.”

Brian Byerly is a Golden High School graduate who is a former fly fishing guide for Orvis.

“I would totally agree that fly fishing is a specialty sport,” he said. “It takes patience and time to learn. It’s not like regular spin fishing, where you put on bait and throw it out there and wait for fish to come eat it. Fly fishing you have to match different hatches, different times and there are different ways of reading water and presenting flies.

“Some flies are on top of the water and some are below the surface. There is a skill involved that is different from every other kind of fishing.”

Byerly revealed he catered to mostly beginners on his tours.

“Most of the people, probably 75 percent were beginners,” he added. “You take the time and teach them right and they catch on. It does take time. Different people learn at different paces. But people absolutely catch on.”

Vince Coleman and his son Jake work for Alpine Tackle Supply in Centennial and have been fly fishing and working in the industry for years.

“I find fly fishing to be the most therapeutic thing ever,” said Vince. “You fish rivers more than lakes and there is something about standing in the moving water, the noise, the sound of the water flowing through your legs and you pretty much just get taken away by the river.

“If you troll for four hours it can be boring. You are waiting for something to happen. In fly fishing a lot of time it is visual. You are always moving. It’s kind of a little hunting involved with it. You can see that fish and you are trying to fool that fish. You are watching your fly come down the river and watch the fish come up slowly and take it.”

Jake Coleman admits he plays second fiddle to his dad when it comes to catching fish.

“Some days we’ll go fishing and I’ll watch Dad catch fish and I won’t catch anything but it’s not a bad day. I spent all day hanging out in the water.

“Fly fishing is more technical. I’m huge on sight fishing. I’m going to find a pond with trout and I can see all the fish. I’m not going to fish a big lake where you cast and hope for the best.”

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