G Line delayed for foreseeable future

State regulators say RTD crossing technology remains unsafe to test

Staff report
Posted 10/3/17

Last week was one of highs and lows for RTD.

On Wedneday, the state Public Utilities Commission (PUC) unanimously voted against allowing RTD to resume full testing of the long-delayed G Line commuter rail line. The next day however, RTD received …

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G Line delayed for foreseeable future

State regulators say RTD crossing technology remains unsafe to test

Posted

Last week was one of highs and lows for RTD.

On Wedneday, the state Public Utilities Commission (PUC) unanimously voted against allowing RTD to resume full testing of the long-delayed G Line commuter rail line. The next day however, RTD received word that the Federal Railroad Administration would be granting a five-year waiver to allow the A and B commuter rail lines to continue running, while RTD continues to work on a plan to solve ongoing issues with its crossing gate technology.

For now, the A Line running between Union Station and Denver International Airport, and the B Line running from Westminster to Union Station, will continue to operate, though extra safety flaggers will still be required at every road crossing.

The timing gate technology, which regulators say is leaving the crossing arms down for 20 seconds too long when trains go by, is the root of the problem. A different technology is used to control the crossing arms along RTD’s light rail lines, which are unaffected.

The 11-mile long G Line, with seven stations in Denver, Wheat Ridge and Arvada, had been slated to go into use in the fall of 2016. Instead, the PUC decision means that months of needed crossing gate testing cannot begin until next year.

RTD could not be reached for comment on the future of the G Line.

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