Letter to the edtor: Bury the death penalty

Posted 1/15/20

 

My college boyfriend was murdered in 1979. That same year, my manager at the bookstore I worked at was murdered. More than a decade later, a client I represented in a divorce proceeding was …

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Letter to the edtor: Bury the death penalty

Posted

My college boyfriend was murdered in 1979. That same year, my manager at the bookstore I worked at was murdered. More than a decade later, a client I represented in a divorce proceeding was murdered by her husband. Then, a fellow attorney was killed by her client’s husband. Despite all of this heartbreak and loss, I oppose the death penalty.

Proponents argue that the death penalty is reserved for the “most heinous” murders, yet, of the 539 death eligible murderers in Colorado, only three are on death row. Countless law enforcement hours are spent chasing death penalty convictions instead of investigating the 1,200 unsolved murder cases in Colorado. Instead of arbitrarily picking the “worst” murderers to put to death, we should ensure that all murderers are caught and held responsible.

This idea that the death penalty brings closure for victims’ families is a myth. The lengthy death penalty process promises an execution but rarely delivers. In Colorado, only one person has been executed in the last 50 years. While a death penalty trial ensures notoriety for the murderer, families spend decades in court reliving the violent deaths of their loved ones. Research shows that the death penalty divides families and prolongs their pain more than it brings comfort.

I urge Senator Tammy Story to vote in favor of ending the death penalty.

Rosemary Coffman,

Golden

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