Renewable water coming to rural communities

Project slated to begin delivery by February

Posted 8/15/16

A regional partnership called the Northwest Douglas County Water Project will result in renewable water for existing homes and businesses in rural, northwest Douglas County by spring 2017.

For the past 20 years, residents in Plum Valley Heights, …

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Renewable water coming to rural communities

Project slated to begin delivery by February

Posted

A regional partnership called the Northwest Douglas County Water Project will result in renewable water for existing homes and businesses in rural, northwest Douglas County by spring 2017.

For the past 20 years, residents in Plum Valley Heights, Chatfield Estates/Acres, Chatfield East and the Titan Road Industrial Park Chatfield have been using well water, a nonrenewable source.

Keith Lehmannis president of the Chatfield East Property Association, which accounts for about 150 lots across Chatfield East and Chatfield Estates — communities southwest of Highlands Ranch.

In the back of Lehmann's pickup truck is a 300-gallon tank of water. For the past three years he's filled the tank nearly every night to bring water to his underground cistern, which supplements water in the well.

The Northwest Douglas County Water Project will make a difference in Lehmann's home.

“It means we can do dishes and take a shower at the same time,” he said. “Now, if my wife is doing laundry she won't turn on the dishwasher. If we are watering the yard, we try not to bathe.”

The water agreement — among Douglas County, Aurora Water, Centennial Water and Sanitation District, Roxborough Water and Sanitation District and the Colorado Water Conservation Board — will deliver treated water to about 180 homes and 31 businesses in the northwest communities by February.

The county's role in the partnership is its Water Alternatives Program, which was created in 2013 in an effort to help communities that owned wells. The county also took the lead in securing Aurora Water as a partner, according to a media release from county officials.

Communities will share infrastructure, Moore said, which is much more cost-effective.

Roxborough Water and Sanitation will deliver treated water from Aurora Water to paying customers in Plum Valley Heights. Centennial Water and Sanitation will treat, store and deliver water from Aurora Water to paying customers in Chatfield Estates, Chatfield Acres and Titan Road Industrial.

Construction of the appropriate delivery infrastructure is expected to begin next week.

The project, said Moore, is an example for other rural communities in Douglas County and around the state and a “showcase for what persistent, committed and unified communities and government can accomplish by working together.”

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