Taking the curve out of it

Scoliosis patient raises funds for holistic treatment

Crystal Anderson
Posted 9/30/14

Kara Sloper and her family have been reaching out to friends, colleagues, and neighbors seeking funds to cover a life-changing scoliosis therapy for a year.

Last Thursday, she started treatment.

In early spring 2013, Sloper, 14, was diagnosed …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Taking the curve out of it

Scoliosis patient raises funds for holistic treatment

Posted

Kara Sloper and her family have been reaching out to friends, colleagues, and neighbors seeking funds to cover a life-changing scoliosis therapy for a year.

Last Thursday, she started treatment.

In early spring 2013, Sloper, 14, was diagnosed with scoliosis, or the sideways curving of the spine. Her curve, known as a “S” Curve, curves approximately 57 and 51 degrees, causing pressure and pain within her lungs, vertebrae, neck and head.

“I can’t do much physical exercise because it’s hard to breathe,” Sloper said. “I can’t pick up my little cousins, I get headaches, my neck hurts a lot and I feel nauseated.”

After diagnosis, Sloper and her grandparents, who live in Elizabeth, Colorado, began researching nontraditional treatment options across the state, finding Dr. Jane Leavell and the Rhino Scoliosis Center, 4045 Wadsworth Blvd., a good fit.

“I’m doing this treatment because the doctors, the stuff that they do is insufficient,” Sloper said.

A nonsurgical scoliosis treatment facility, Rhino works with patients to help reduce the curvature of their spine in a gentle, healing way. Rather than using a brace or surgery, Leavell works to reduce curves by 20 - 30 percent through a series of exercises, joint stretching, and adjustments in the initial phase of treatment.

For her it’s about healing the patient, so they and their families can live their lives to the fullest.

“It’s not you have a kid with scoliosis and all these other things going on in your life, it should be you have a life and your kid just happens to have scoliosis,” she said. “It’s a different focus where you can actually focus on your life instead of a condition.”

The initial treatment costs about $4,950, with additional costs for adjustments, massage therapy and travel expenses. Inspired to help Sloper and her family bear the financial burden, Leavell decided to start the Leavell Foundation. Through this organization, Leavell is devoted to helping heal kids without having the cost of treatment be a stress upon family finances.

Using Sloper as her first beneficiary, Leavell, Sloper and her family, began raising funds through a GoFundMe campaign, a pancake breakfast, and a triathlon in an effort finance her treatment.

“One of the reasons I chose Kara as my first fundraiser is because of her character,” Leavell said. “She’s a very polite young lady who is intelligent, loving. I’m very impressed by her. She’s a very deserving kid who doesn’t have a way.”

The foundation is still in the development phases, but organizers are eager to help patients, so interested parties are encouraged to inquire.

Currently, Sloper is more than halfway to her $10,000 goal, and is looking for more ways to fund the remainder of her treatments.

For more information or to donate to Sloper’s campaign, visit www.gofundme.com/Kara-the-Archer or call 303-452-7300.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.